July 19-21 City of Springfield Heat Advisory and Cooling Centers

Beat the heat at a cooling center in Springfield Friday July 19 – Sunday July 21.

Mayor Sarno, along with the Commissioner of Health and Human Services, Helen R. Caulton-Harris, announced today that the City of Springfield will open Cooling Centers in the City on Friday, July 19, 2019 to Sunday, July 21, 2019.  The sites are:

Libraries Address Days and Hours
Brightwood 359 Plainfield St. Friday, July 19, 9am-5pm
East Forest Park 122 Island Pond Rd Friday, July 19,  10am-5pm
Saturday, July 20,  11am-3pm
East Springfield 21 Osborne Terr Friday, July 19,  10am-5pm
Saturday, July 20,  11am-3pm
Forest Park 380 Belmont Ave. Friday, July 19,  1pm-5pm
Saturday, July 20,  11am-3pm
Indian Orchard 44 Oak St. Friday, July 19,  1pm-5pm
Saturday, July 20,  11am-3pm
Mason Square 765 State Street. Friday, July 19,  1pm-5pm
Saturday, July 20,  11am-3pm
Sixteen Acres 1187 Parker St. Friday, July 19,  1pm-5pm
Saturday, July 20,  11am-3pm
Additional Sites:
Raymond A. Jordan 1476 Roosevelt Ave Friday, July 19, 8am-4pm
Saturday, July 20, 12pm-6pm
Sunday, July 21, 12pm-6pm
Clodo Conception y Center 1187 1/2 Parker St. Friday, July 19, 9am-8pm
Saturday, July 20, 12pm-6pm
Sunday, July 21, 12pm-6pm
Kenefick Park Plainfield Street (Behind Gerena School) Saturday, July 20, 12pm-6pm
Sunday, July 21, 12pm-6pm

Heat stress is a serious condition that poses a health threat to many people, particularly the elderly.  Heat stress places a strain on the body, and if the strain becomes too great, it can cause serious and permanent damage, even death. Preventive measures should be taken in order to avoid heat stress.

Certain medical conditions and prescription drugs can make you more vulnerable you more vulnerable to heat stress. Those who have high blood pressure, diabetes, a weak or damaged heart, infection or fever, diarrhea, problems with circulation, skin diseases, sunburn, those who are overweight, or who have had a previous stroke are at a greater risk of falling victim to heat stress.  In addition, those who take medication for sleeplessness, high blood pressure, nervousness, depression, or poor circulation are also more susceptible to heat stress. If you fall into either of these categories, consult your doctor of pharmacist for advice.

Loss of appetite, lack of energy, fainting, and cramps are signs that you are losing the battle against heat.  Take the appropriate steps to protect yourself.

What you should do if the weather is extremely hot:

  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals.  Avoid using salt tables unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much as possible.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day.  Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

Keep your four legged friends safely and comfortably at home during the extreme heat. 

  • Never leave an animal in a parked car.  Car rides can quickly turn deadly as the inside of a car can reach temperatures in excess of 120 degrees in several minutes.
  • Bring outdoor animals into cooler areas of your home.  If they must stay outside, ensure they have protection from the sun.  A dog house does not provide relief or protection from the heat.  Access to plenty of shade and cool, potable water is critical to their well being.
  • Limit exercise to hours when the sun is down and take it easy or better yet, wait until the heat wave ends.  Pets are prone to heat exhaustion just like people.  In addition, hot asphalt can burn their feet.
  • Animals are susceptible to sunburn.  Be sure any topical sunscreen products you use are labeled for use on animals.

Source: City of Springfield

Discover Your Summer: Read and Win Prizes!

This summer from June 17 to August 17, join our Reading Club to read and get rewards, and enter raffles for prizes! | All Ages

This summer from June 17 to August 17, join our Reading Club to read and get rewards, and enter raffles for prizes!

Young Children Ages 0-5
Reading to a child each day helps them to become a READER! Color an icon in a reading log (pick up at any library location) for each day you read together. Complete 10 days and bring in your log for a prize. Return the log when you reach 15, 20, 25, and 30 days and you’ll receive a raffle ticket for a variety of prizes.

Kids, Teens and Adults
Read every day! Read at least 20 minutes a day, then color an icon on your reading log (pick up at any library location). Complete 10 days and return your log to get a book bag filled with incentives and prizes. Return the log when you reach 15, 20, 25, and 30 days and you’ll receive a raffle ticket for a variety of prizes.

What Counts as Reading?
Books • Magazines • Graphic Novels, Comics & Manga • Audiobooks • E-books • Online Articles • Gaming Manuals

And Kids Can Count as Reading:
A cereal box • As a family • On street signs • During storytimes • To pets and toys

But wait, there’s more!

Roller Skating Party!
Monday, August 12th 6-8 PM
Kids can earn a ticket to our special roller skating party! Ask us how to get an invitation.

Springfield opens 12 cooling centers including many library locations

Beat the heat and stay cool at locations around the city July 9, 10, and 11.

Springfield is opening cooling centers at 12 neighborhood locations July 9-11, 2019.

Mayor Domenic J. Sarno and Health and Human Services Commissioner Helen R. Caulton-Harris announced the cooling centers at the following eight library locations:

  • Brightwood, 359 Plainfield St., Tuesday, 1 to 8 p.m.; Wednesday, 1 to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • East Forest Park, 122 Island Pond Road, Tuesday, 1 to 5 p.m., Wednesday, 1 to 8 p.m., and Thursday, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • East Springfield, 21 Osborne Terrace, Tuesday, 1 to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, 1 to 8 p.m.; and Thursday, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Forest Park, 380 Belmont Ave., Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, 1 to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, 1 to 8 p.m.
  • Indian Orchard, 44 Oak St., Tuesday, 1 to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, 1 to 8 p.m.; and Thursday, 1 to 5 p.m.
  • Library Express at Pine Point, 204 Boston Road, Wednesday, 1 to 6 p.m.
  • Mason Square, 765 State St., Tuesday, 1 to 5 p.m.; Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, 1 to 8 p.m.
  • Sixteen Acres, 1187 Parker St., Tuesday, 1 to 8 p.m.; Wednesday, 1 to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Additional sites are:

  • Greenleaf Community Center, 1187 1/2 Parker St., Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Hungry Hill Senior Center, 773 Liberty St., Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Riverview Center, 122 Clyde St., Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Raymond A. Jordan Senior Center, 1476 Roosevelt Ave., Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Heat stress is a serious condition that poses a health threat to many people, particularly the elderly.  Heat stress places a strain on the body, and if the strain becomes too great, it can cause serious and permanent damage, even death. Preventive measures should be taken in order to avoid heat stress.

What you should do if the weather is extremely hot:

  • Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.
  • Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, and other community facilities. Circulating air can cool the body by increasing the perspiration rate of evaporation.
  • Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid using salt tables unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.
  • Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much as possible.
  • Protect face and head by wearing a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in closed vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

Keep your four legged friends safely and comfortably at home during the extreme heat. 

  • Never leave an animal in a parked car.  Car rides can quickly turn deadly as the inside of a car can reach temperatures in excess of 120 degrees in several minutes.
  • Bring outdoor animals into cooler areas of your home.  If they must stay outside, ensure they have protection from the sun.  A dog house does not provide relief or protection from the heat.  Access to plenty of shade and cool, potable water is critical to their well being.
  • Limit exercise to hours when the sun is down and take it easy or better yet, wait until the heat wave ends.  Pets are prone to heat exhaustion just like people.  In addition, hot asphalt can burn their feet.
  • Animals are susceptible to sunburn.  Be sure any topical sunscreen products you use are labeled for use on animals.

Sources: MassLive, City of Springfield Division of Health/Human Services

2019 School Summer Reading Lists

2019 assigned summer reading lists and resources for area schools | Children and Teens

2019 School Summer Reading Lists Image

Academy Hill School, Springfield MA

2019 Summer Reading Assignments (website)

Central High School, Springfield MA

AP Summer Assignments (website)

Chicopee Comprehensive High School

2019 Reading Lists (website)

Hampden Charter School of Science, Chicopee MA

Summer Reading (website)

Minnechaug Regional High School, Wilbraham, MA

Band of Sisters by Kirsten A. Holmstedt – Non-Fiction Selection
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith – Classic Selection
Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens- Fiction Selection/ coming of age.
The Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi – YA Fantasy Selection
The Young World by Chris Weitz- Science Fiction

Pioneer Valley Performing Arts Charter Public School, South Hadley MA

Incoming 7th Grade Summer Reading Assignment (Updated July 15, 2019)
8th Grade Summer Reading Assignment
9th Grade Summer Reading Assignment
10th Grade Summer Reading Assignment

Pope Francis High School, Chicopee MA

Summer Reading List 2019 – Freshman
Summer Reading List 2019 – Sophomore
Summer Reading List 2019 – Junior
Summer Reading List 2019 – Senior

Springfield Public Schools, Springfield MA

6th Grade Summer Reading List 2019
7th Grade Summer Reading List 2019
8th Grade Summer Reading List 2019
9th Grade Summer Reading List 2019
10th Grade Summer Reading List 2019
11th Grade Summer Reading List 2019
12th Grade Summer Reading List 2019

St Michael’s Academy, Springfield MA

2019 Summer Work (website)

Women@Work: a City-Wide Collaborative

Women@Work: Influence and Impact is a city of Springfield-wide collaborative of programs, exhibitions, and gatherings celebrating the power of women.

Women@Work highlights women’s achievements in visual and performing arts, science and literature,
and community-building and social outreach.

At the hub of this collaborative is a major exhibition at the Springfield Museums
exploring artist Isabel Bishop’s work, which depicts ordinary women in an extraordinary
way. Isabel Bishop’s Working Women: Defying Convention explores how Bishop
not only defined herself as a unique, independent, and unconventional artist, but also
how she changed how artists perceive and portray women.

Bishop’s work and her subject matter prompted Museum Director Kay Simpson and her
team to think about broadening the examination of women and their work and to involve
community partners from the arts and culture, area colleges, the media, social services
and businesses led by women.

Simpson convened a group of stakeholders and the idea blossomed into a year-long
calendar of exhibits and events highlighting the work women have done and do today.
Please join us to celebrate the influence and impact of Women@Work.

Click here to view the Women@Work events calendar.

Special thanks to TSM Design for the Women@Work logo.

CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS MEANS NEW ENTRANCE FOR CENTRAL LIBRARY

Central Library visitors will enter through Quadrangle door starting December 12.

Visitors to the Springfield City Library’s Central Library should enter through the door facing the Springfield Museums, starting December 12. Doors on State Street will not reopen until the next construction phase is complete. The Library’s newly constructed ramp means that pedestrians and wheelchair and stroller users alike can enter the building on the Quadrangle side. Museums staff welcome library visitors to park in their lots on Edwards Street. Accessible parking for vehicles displaying a license plate or placard is in a small lot between the George Walter Vincent Smith and Springfield Science museums; enter through the State Street driveway.

The new ramp is part of a renovation of the historic Central Library which opened in 1912. The City of Springfield is funding the project, with supplementary grant funding from the Massachusetts Cultural Council through its Cultural Facilities Fund. Besides the ramp construction, ongoing improvements include remediation of water leaks, replacement of a worn roof, and restoration of cornices lining the roof profile. The next step dismantles and restores the marble staircase on the State Street side of the building, necessitating the closure of the surrounding doors for public safety.

The Central Library, located at 220 State Street, is the headquarters for Springfield’s nine-location system. It remains open its regular schedule during construction: Mondays and Wednesdays, 12 to 8; Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 9 to 5; and Sundays, 12 to 5. The Massachusetts Cultural Council is a state agency.

Founded in 1857, the Springfield City Library provides nearly 5000 educational and recreational programs per year. To learn more, visit www.springfieldlibrary.org.

Small Talk Springfield Parent Groups

Parents! You have the power to jumpstart your baby’s development!

Sign up for Small Talk and participate in 13 FREE classes filled with learning, support and fun! Light refreshments and childcare are provided, and your child will receive a FREE book after each session.

About the classes: We’re providing a new program where you can learn how to help your baby’s brain grow through talk and play. Everything is free!

Benefits of Participating:

  • You will learn fun new ways to talk, read and play with your baby and receive feedback with an exciting new talk pedometer.
  • You will learn how these skills help your baby’s brain grow.
  • You will receive free baby supplies – and a chance to win gift cards!

Sign up if:

  •  Your child is 0-32 months old.
  • You have access to a cell phone.
  • Your schedule allows you to commit to attending the classes and completing the word counter recordings.

Join us!

We are always adding new sessions. Call to sign up or to ask questions.

Contact information:

Diane Houle
413-263-6828 x 293
dhoule@springfieldlibrary.org

Book List – 2018 Teens’ Top Ten

The Teens’ Top Ten is a “teen choice” list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year!

TitleAuthor
Turtles All the Way Down John Green
One of Us is LyingKaren M. McManus
WarcrossMarie Lu
Wonder Woman: Warbringer Leigh Bardugo
CaravalStephanie Garber
Long Way Down Jason Reynolds
I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican DaughterErika L. Sánchez
Paper HeartsAli Novak
Strange the Dreamer Laini Taylor
Once and For AllSarah Dessen

2018 Teens’ Top Ten list announced!

Nominators are members of teen book groups in fifteen school and public libraries around the country. Nominations are posted on the Thursday of National Library Week, and teens across the country vote on their favorite titles each year. Readers ages twelve to eighteen voted online between August 15 and Teen Read Week™ (October 7-13, 2018) on the Teens’ Top Ten site.

The Teens’ Top Ten is a project of ALA’s Young Adult Library Services Association. For more great reads visit their Teen Book Finder Database.

Download a pdf file of the Teens’ Top Ten list.

Museum Passes

Check out our museum passes! Free or reduced admission to area Museums and Parks.

Massachusetts Annual Parks Pass
Please check the list of parks available with the pass in the catalog description.

Passes available at the Central Library – Check for availability in the catalog

The pass entitles the bearer to free parking for one vehicle (excluding buses and 15-passenger vans) at over 50 day-use facilites in the State Parks system that charge a parking fee.


Mystic Aquarium and Ocean Exploration Center
55 Coogan Boulevard, Mystic, CT
(860) 572-5955

Passes available at the Central Library, East Forest Park Branch, Forest Park, Indian Orchard Branch, Sixteen Acres Branch – Check for availability in the catalog

Pass valid for $5.00 off per person for up to four people. Good on general admission only. This offer cannot be copied or combined with any other offer. Pass cannot be used for special events and programs. Pass must be presented at time of admission. Pass may only be used once per day.
Open daily except for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Hours vary, please see the Aquarium’s website for hours.


USS Constitution Museum
Building 22, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston. MA
(617) 426-1812

Passes available at all library locations – Check for availability in the catalog

Admits: Free admission. Limited to parties of 9 or fewer – 1 pass per party.
“The USS Constitution Museum, located in the Charlestown Navy Yard, serves as the memory and educational voice of USS Constitution by collecting, preserving, and interpreting the stories of ‘Old Ironsides’ and the people associated with her. The museum offers a variety of engaging activities, exhibits, and programs, including our interactive exhibit, All Hands on Deck: A Sailor’s Life in 1812, where visitors can furl a sail, sleep in a hammock, and scrub the deck as they join Constitution’s crew in 1812!”
“This year [2015] is particularly exciting as restoration work is planned for USS Constitution. The ship is scheduled to enter dry dock in May right outside the museum’s front door. Visitors will have a rare opportunity to see the ship from a completely new perspective. We’re celebrating with a new exhibit about the ship’s construction – Forest to Frigate – opening this summer.”


FYI
Springfield Residents always have free general admission to the Springfield Museums.

Five world-class museums, including the Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum and the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden are located right downtown next to the Central Library.

Come Explore!

Springfield Museums
21 Edwards Street, Springfield, MA
(413) 263 – 6800

Free general admission for Springfield Residents during regular museum hours with valid ID. Visitors ages 3-17 accompanied by a non-Springfield resident adult must present a Springfield school ID.

Central Library Plaza Construction Update

New artist renderings of the plaza are available for public viewing.

March 2018 –

The Central Library is currently undergoing renovation, repairs, and construction. Part of the project includes tearing down the old, unsafe entrance ramp at the northwest library entrance (facing the Springfield Museums). The old ramp will be replaced by a new accessible ramp, stairs, and plaza connecting to the Smith Museum. Construction is expected to be completed in August 2018.

Click on images for enlarged views.