Family Roots In Old Neighborhood Bring Gift To New Library (WAMC)

In recognition of the gift, the library named the children’s reading room in honor of William and Patricia White. This brings the $2 million campaign up to $1.6 million.

Link to audio and entire article here.

An excerpt:

A family gift aims to make reading and library access available to generations of children in a Springfield, Massachusetts neighborhood.

When John White and his five siblings were children growing up on Wendover Road in East Forest Park five decades ago, their mother always made sure to take them to the bookmobile when it stopped in their neighborhood.

“I remember vividly our mother would walk us down the hill to Old Brook Road and we would go to the bookmobile,” White said.

The children of William and Patricia White grew to have successful professional careers and all moved from Springfield – John White lives in California.

“Springfield and East Forest Park are in our hearts – always have been and always will be,” White said.

The siblings returned to their old neighborhood recently to announce a $200,000 gift to the new East Forest Park Library in their parents’ memory.

“As kids our parents instilled in us the notion of learning and education and the significance of it,” White said. “They also instilled in us the importance of giving back to the community.”

In recognition of the gift, the library named the children’s reading room in honor of William and Patricia White.

John White said if his mother could see the new library she would be proud and happy.

“It is a bigger better bookmobile,” White said. He praised the design of the new library and the technology that it contains.

“It is a great place for kids to come and learn,” he added.

At an event acknowledging the White family’s gift, Springfield Library Foundation President Pat Markey said it will help relaunch the fundraising to support the new library that had been paused because of the pandemic.

“With this gift they bring our $2 million campaign up to $1.6 million,” Markey announced.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno also thanked the Whites and said their generosity will impact countless numbers of children who will use the library.

“That is just such a great great legacy,” Sarno said.

Read entire article at this link.

Central Library Building Reopens; All 9 Springfield City Library Locations Resume Regular Schedule

Beginning Tuesday, September 7th 2021, the Central Library will open its doors to the community after 17 long months. Branch libraries will also resume operating full schedules on that date.

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.- September 2, 2021 – The Springfield City Library announced today that beginning Tuesday, September 7th 2021, the Central Library, located at 220 State Street, will open its doors to the community after 17 long months. Branch libraries will also resume operating full schedules on that date. Click for the hours of operation.

The Springfield City Library has taken every precaution possible to ensure all safety measures are being met and have obtained air handling units to improve air circulation and ventilation. Libraries are in compliance with the City’s mask mandate that requires all staff and visitors to wear masks covering their mouth and nose at all times while in the Library. Disposable masks and hand sanitizer will be available at the entrances. Staff members are eager to open the doors and welcome the community back into the building that has seemed so empty without them.

Springfield City Library Director Molly Fogarty stated, “We are so thrilled to be welcoming back patrons at the Central Library location. It was great being able to open the other branches over the summer and this feels like the final piece to the puzzle “

Founded in 1857, the Springfield City Library provides nearly 5000 educational and recreational programs per year. To learn more, visit www.springfieldlibrary.org.

Reopening News

Springfield City Library branches reopen for limited hours starting July 6. Click for more details.

On Tuesday, July 6, 2021 most library locations will reopen on a reduced schedule as follows:

Brightwood Branch, East Forest Park Branch, Forest Park Branch, East Springfield Branch, Indian Orchard Branch, Mason Square Branch, and Sixteen Acres Branch:

Monday – 1pm-5pm
Tuesday – 1pm-5pm
Wednesday – 1pm-6pm
Thursday – 1pm-5pm
Friday – 1pm-5pm
Saturday – 11am-3pm*

*Brightwood will remain closed on Saturdays

Library Express at Pine Point:

Monday – 1pm-5pm
Tuesday – Closed
Wednesday – 1pm-6pm
Thursday – Closed
Friday – 1pm-5pm
Saturday – Closed

The Central Library building will remain closed due to a lack of air conditioning.

Curbside pickup service will continue at all locations for those who prefer that option.

No indoor programming will be scheduled in the libraries during the limited summer hours.

NEW: We will soon allow bookings of community rooms for events held October 4 and later. Please check our meeting rooms page for a link to reserve rooms.


Starting Tuesday, September 7, 2021 the Central Library and all branches will be open regular (pre-Covid) hours.


We will update you if anything changes – you can keep up to date with our Facebook, Instagram, or email newsletter.

Increasing Community Internet Access: Introducing Hotspots

The Library will circulate internet hotspots for those in the community that do not have internet access at home.

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. – May 5TH, 2021 – With the doors still being closed to the public, the Springfield City Library is determined to continue its efforts in maintaining and increasing access to Springfield residents. The Library will start circulating hotspots, effective immediately, for those in the community that do not have internet access at home.

CLICK TO RESERVE A HOTSPOT IN THE CATALOG.

The borrowing program will begin slowly, with just six hotspots available at the Central Library, Mason Square and Forest Park Branches. The hotspots are available through curbside pick-up or during open hours.

Any Springfield City Library cardholder can check one out with their library card after signing a borrower’s agreement; patrons under the age of 18 will need a guardian to sign. The hotspots can circulate for 14 days, fine-free, but will stop working after the designated timeframe and must be returned to the location it was originally borrowed from.

The hotspots will come with instructions and library staff will be available to offer troubleshooting tips. Each hotspot supports up to 16 devices.

The Library is very excited to begin offering these hotspots and knows how important they can be. Tom O’Connell, Manager of Tech Services and Collection Development says, “We look around us and, seemingly, everyone already has access to the Internet – and all of the resources that come with it. But it is important to remember that – what most of us take for granted – many in our community still lack. These easy to use devices allow us to provide online access for patrons who would otherwise miss out on utilizing these resources – whether it is to do homework, or apply for a job, or look up a recipe; putting all of this information in their hands is the goal.”

The Springfield City library hopes that a positive response to these devices will lead to an acquisition of many more for each of the branches. Call your neighborhood branch to request a hotspot or dial 413-263-6828, ext. 218.

Founded in 1857, the Springfield City Library provides over 800,000 free print, physical, and digital resources for public enrichment. To learn more, visit www.springfieldlibrary.org

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Welcome To Your Library Videos

Watch these fun short videos about each of our 9 locations!

Central Library

Brightwood Branch Library

East Forest Park Branch Library

East Springfield Branch Library

Forest Park Branch Library

Indian Orchard Branch Library

Library Express at Pine Point

Mason Square Branch Library

Sixteen Acres Branch Library

Books About Anti-Racism and Marginalized Voices

A selection of books and audiobooks on anti-racism and marginalized voices from the Springfield City Library.

This is a list of anti-racism books held at the Springfield City Library as of June 27, 2020, with links to our catalog.

Those books available as electronic items (eBooks and eAudiobooks) in Hoopla have links as well.

We also have an extensive curated collection of electronic items (eBooks and eAudiobooks) available on Overdrive and through the Libby app.


Here are some top choices, alphabetical by author, with a more extensive list below.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (2011) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

El color de la justicia: la nueva segregación racial en Estados Unidos por Michelle Alexander (2017) (también en Hoopla como audiolibro electrónico)

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin (1963)

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (2015)

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DeAngelo (2018)

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge (2017)

Policing Black Bodies: How Black Lives Are Surveilled and How to Work for Change by Angela Hattery and Earl Smith (2018)

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall (2020)

How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (2019)

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi (2016) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele (2018) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches by Audre Lorde (1984) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools by Monique W. Morris (2018) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo (2018) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds (2020)

Me and White Supremacy: Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor by Layla F. Saad (2020) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race by Jesmyn Ward, editor (2016)

Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence by Chad Louis Williams, Kidada E. Williams, and Keisha N. Blain (2016)

 


 

Black Lotus: A Woman’s Search for Racial Identity by Sil Lai Abrams (2016)

Cuz: Or, the Life and Times of Michael A. by Danielle S. Allen (2017)

We Are Not Yet Equal: Understanding Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson and Tonya Bolden (2018)

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou (1969)

Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza by Gloria Anzaldua (1987)

Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting in America by Nefertiti Austin (2019) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

Malaya: Essays on Freedom by Cinelle Barnes (2019)

Things That Make White People Uncomfortable by Michael Bennett and Dave Zirin (2018) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

Black is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother’s Time, My Mother’s Time, and Mine by Emily Bernard (2019)

A Black Women’s History of the United States by Daina Ramey Berry and Kali N. Gross (2020)

Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II by Douglas A. Blackmon (2008)

Black Detroit: A People’s History of Self-Determination by Herb Boyd (2017)

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics by Donna Brazile, Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry, Minyon Moore, and Veronica Chambers (2018) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown (2018)

The Pretty One: On Life, Pop Culture, Disability, and Other Reasons to Fall in Love with Me by Keah Brown (2019)

The Heritage: Black Athletes, A Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism by Howard Bryant (2018)

Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women by Susan Burton and Cari Lynn (2017) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

Chokehold: Policing Black Men by Paul Butler (2017) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

This Stops Today: Eric Garner’s Mother Seeks Justice After Losing Her Son by Gwen Carr and Dave Smitherman (2018) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

Unapologetic: A Black, Queer, and Feminist Mandate for Radical Movements by Charlene A. Carruthers (2018)

We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation by Jeff Chang (2016)

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy by Ta-Nehisi Coates (2017)

Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower by Brittney C. Cooper (2018) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education by Jennine Capo Crucet (2019)

Thick: And Other Essays by Tressie McMillan Cottom, Tressie McMillan (2019) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

A Drop of Midnight: A Memoir by Jason Timbuktu Diakite (2020)

Ordinary Girls: A Memoir by Jaquira Diaz (2019) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

“All the Real Indians Died Off”: And 20 Other Myths About Native Americans by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker (2016) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson (2016) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson (2017)

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do by Jennifer L. Eberhardt (2019)

How to Make White People Laugh by Negin Farsad (2016)

How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide by Crystal M. Fleming (2018)

Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin by Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin (2017)

Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (2019)

Bad Feminist: Essays by Roxane Gay (2014) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay (2017) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Inherently Unequal: The Betrayal of Equal Rights by the Supreme Court, 1865-1903 by Lawrence Goldstone (2011)

On Account of Race: The Supreme Court, White Supremacy, and the Ravaging of African American Voting Rights by Lawrence Goldstone (2020) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

Conversations in Black: On Power, Politics, and Leadership by Ed Gordon (2020)

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero and Michelle Burford (2016)

En el país que amamos: mi familia dividida por Diane Guerrero y Michelle Burford (2016)

The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer: To Tell it Like It Is by Fannie Lou Hamer (2011)

Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America by Melissa V. Harris-Perry (2011) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

A Colony in a Nation by Chris Hayes 2017

A Cup of Water Under My Bed: A Memoir by Daisy Hernandez (2017)

Children of the Land by Marcelo Hernandez Castillo (2020) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing: The Incarceration of African American Women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland by DaMaris B. Hill (2019)

Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond by Marc Lamont Hill (2016) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row by Anthony Ray Hinton and Lara Love Hardin (2018)

Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning by Cathy Park Hong (2020)

The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism, and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement by Matthew Horace and Ron Harris (2018)

Making Our Way Home: The Great Migration and the Black American Dream [graphic novel] written by Blair Imani and illustrated by Rachelle Baker (2020)

Waking Up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race by Debby Irving (2014) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh Immigrants Shape our Multiracial Future by Deepa Iyer (2015) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family by Mitchell S. Jackson (2019)

This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America by Morgan Jerkins (2018) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

Reclaiming Our Space: How Black Feminists Are Changing the World from the Tweets to the Streets by Feminista Jones (2019)

How We Fight for Our Lives: A Memoir by Saeed Jones (2019)

Talking About Race: A Workbook About White People Fostering Racial Equality in Their Lives by Kaolin (2010)

Black Indians: A Heritage by William Loren Katz (2012) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Whiter: Asian American Women on Skin Color and Colorism by Nikki Khanna (2020)

Understanding Mass Incarceration: A People’s Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time by James William Kilgore (2015) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon (2018)

The Making of Asian America: A History by Erika Lee (2015)

My Sister: How One Sibling’s Transition Changed Us Both by Selenis Leyva, Marizol Leyva, and Emily Chammah (2020)

The Turtle’s Beating Heart: One Family’s Story of Lenape Survival by Denise Low (2017)

The War on Neighborhoods: Policing, Prison, and Punishment in a Divided City by Ryan Lugalia-Hollon and Daniel Cooper (2018)

Real American: a Memoir by Julie Lythcott-Haims (2017) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance—A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power by Danielle L. McGuire (2010)

Tell the Truth & Shame the Devil: The Life, Legacy, and Love of My Son Michael Brown by Lezley McSpadden and Lyah Beth LeFlore (2016) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies by Resmaa Menakem (2017)

My Brown Baby: On the Joys and Challenges of Raising African American Children by Denene Millner (2017)

Surpassing Certainty: What My Twenties Taught Me by Janet Mock (2017)

Latinas and Latinos on TV: Colorblind Comedy in the Post-racial Network Era by Isabel Molina-Guzman (2018)

The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates by Wes Moore (2011)

Brown, White, Black: An American Family at the Intersection of Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Religion by Mehra Nishta (2019) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama (1995)

Becoming by Michelle Obama (2018)

An African American and Latinx History of the United States by Paul Ortiz (2018)

Breathe: A Letter to My Sons by Imani Perry (2019)

Excessive Use of Force: A Mother’s Continuing Fight Against Police Misconduct by Loretta P. Prater (2018)

Invisible No More: Police Violence against Black Women and Women of Color by Andrea J. Ritchie (2017)

You Can’t Touch My Hair and Other Things I Still Have to Explain by Phoebe Robinson (2016)

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein (2017)

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City by A.K. Sandoval-Strausz (2019)

Not Quite Not White: Losing and Finding Race in America by Sharmila Sen (2018)

Toxic Inequality: How America’s Wealth Gap Destroys Mobility, Deepens the Racial Divide, & Threatens Our Future by Thomas M. Shaprio (2017) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

The Good Immigrant: 26 Writers Reflect on America by Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman, editors (2019)

Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching: A Young Black Man’s Education by Mychal Denzel Smith (2016)

All Eyes Are Upon Us: Race and Politics from Boston to Brooklyn by Jason Sokol (2014)

How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance by Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin (2019)

Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform by Malcolm K. Sparrow (2016) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

To Protect and Serve: How to Fix America’s Police by Norm Stamper (2016)

Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia by Sabrina Strings (2019) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

I Can’t Breathe: A Killing on Bay Street by Matt Taibbi (2017)

Can We Talk About Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation by Beverly Daniel Tatum (2007)

Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (2019) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (2017) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

Black Fathers: A Call for Healing by Kristin Clark Taylor (2003)

A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History by Jeanne Theoharis (2018)

We Matter: Athletes and Activism by Etan Thomas (2018) (also on Hoopla as eBook)

The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism by Jemar Tisby (2019) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present by David Treuer (2019)

Rez Life: An Indian’s Journey Through Reservation Life by David Treuer (2012) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

The Good the Bad and the Blue by M. Triplett and H. Triplett (2018)

Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine by Damon Tweedy (2015)

America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America by Jim Wallis (2016)

Men We Reaped: A Memoir by Jesmyn Ward (2013)

Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present by Harriet A. Washington (2006) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind by Harriet A. Washington (2019)

Under Our Skin: Getting Real about Race – And Getting Free from the Fears and Frustrations that Divide Us by Benjamin Watson (2015) (also on Hoopla as eBook and eAudiobook)

Well-read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves: An Anthology by Glory Edim, editor (2018)

The autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X and Alex Haley (1965)

Our Black Sons Matter: Mothers Talk about Fears, Sorrows, and Hopes by George Yancy, Maria del Gaudalupe Davidson, and Susan Joan Hadley, editors (2016)

The Souls of Yellow Folk: Essays by Wesley Yang (2018) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays by Damon Young (2019) (also on Hoopla as eAudiobook)

Statement on Racial Justice

Statement from the Library Director and the Springfield Library Commission on Racial Justice

June 5, 2020

On behalf of the Springfield Library Commission and the Library Administration, we are writing to share our personal sense of heartbreak and devastation at the events surrounding the killing of George Floyd by a white police officer in Minneapolis. And we join you and the Springfield Community in your grief and justified anger. As we witness repeated episodes of violence and killings perpetrated against our Black Community by rogue police officers, it is impossible not to experience a deep sense of outrage, disbelief and grief. We honor the lives of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and so many others. We are reaching out to you to share the grief and anger that we know you also feel, but also to reaffirm our common resolve. Both as private citizens and as members of this great institution, we must all do what we can to ensure that we foster a culture of inclusion, equity, and respect for one another. We promise to keep our resolve and strengthen our combined efforts against systemic racism until we can all see that this time justice will prevail and endure. We need to look to each other for strength and hope, and recommit ourselves to our shared goals of making the world a better place for all, especially black and brown people. Now is the time for us to come together as we serve together. Our work has never been more critical. Our concern for each other has never been more important.

We saw a young woman at a recent protest holding a sign with a quote from Angela Davis. It reads, “I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept” This quote is a perfect nest of powerful words to reflect about George Floyd’s death and a call to justice. These words beg people and organizations to change this unacceptable and systemic racism.

The Springfield Library Commission cherishes the work that library staff perform to address literacy challenges, the digital divide, to provide a place where everyone can share ideas and gain knowledge. We believe the incredible mission of the Springfield City Library serves as a powerful force to counter many inequities including racism.

The Springfield City Library is proud to have signed the Urban Library Council’s Statement on Race and Social Equity through which we, along with 167 other Urban Libraries have steadfastly committed to:

  • Eliminating racial and social equity barriers in library programs, services, policies and practices.
  • Creating and maintaining an environment of diversity , inclusion and respect both in our library system and in all aspects of our community role.
  • Ensuring that we are reaching and engaging disenfranchised people in the community and helping them express their voice.
  • Serving as a convener and facilitator of conversations and partnerships to address community challenges.
  • Being forthright on tough issues that are important to our communities.

It is our collective responsibility to examine what we are doing now in light of our commitments that we signed onto, to reevaluate our services and internal culture and to constantly improve and stand with our communities of color.

In the words of the great Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr:

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”

Sincerely,

Stephen Cary: Chair, Springfield Library Commission

Molly Fogarty: Library Director

Molly Fogarty, Director
Springfield City Library – All Yours, Just Ask
220 State St.
Springfield, MA 01103
413-263-6828 ext. 290
lfogarty@springfieldlibrary.org

Stephen Cary
scary@focusspringfield.com

Forest Park Branch: “Gun violence, equality: The raw concerns of Springfield’s youth” (WWLP)

Outside the Forest Park Library are dozens of lawn signs with the raw concerns of Springfield’s youth.

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – They can’t vote yet, but Springfield’s youth has a good handle on what issues face their community and their country.

Outside the Forest Park Library are dozens of lawn signs that look like the ones you typically see during election season. If you look closer, however, you’ll see the raw concerns of Springfield’s youth: gun violence, racism, and sexual harassment.

The project was spearheaded by Forest Park Library’s supervisor Alex Remy and allowed Springfield middle and high schoolers to fill in what they wanted ‘Freedom From’ and ‘Freedom For.’ It was inspired by a similar project at Waltham Public Library.

Click through for article and picture gallery.

Springfield Central Library Celebrates Completion of $4 Million Renovation Project

The Springfield City Library hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony today at the Central Library located at 220 State Street to celebrate the completion of a $4 million renovation and historic restoration project.

10/09/2019 – The Springfield City Library hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony today at the Central Library located at 220 State Street  to celebrate the completion of a $4 million renovation and historic restoration project.  The ceremony featured a number of speakers including Mayor Domenic J. Sarno, Helen Caulton-Harris, Health and Human Services Commissioner, Stephen Cary, Chair of the Springfield Library Commission, Peter Garvey, Director of Capital Asset and Kay Simpson, President of the Springfield Museums.

Mayor Domenic J. Sarno stated, “This is my administration’s continued efforts to improve the physical plan of our municipal buildings.  This effort will also enhance accessibility and the welcoming experience to our Andrew Carnegie Central Library and Quadrangle Museum complex.”

Library Director Molly Fogarty expressed her enthusiasm. “The Central Library is an information and cultural resource for the entire city and is one of Springfield’s most historically significant and heavily used public buildings. The completed renovations provide increased accessibility and enhance the experience for more than 400,000 visitors every year and for generations of visitors.”

The Central Library was built in 1912 and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.  It is among four Springfield libraries and 17,00 around the United States that were funded in part by donations from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Read more at the city website – click here

 

 

Springfield Central Library unveils new ramp and plaza (WWLP)

Improved access to a historical library branch in downtown Springfield.

SPRINGFIELD, Mass (WWLP) – Improved access to a historical library branch in downtown Springfield.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno and City Library Director Molly Fogarty cut the ribbon, unveiling the new ramp and plaza at the library Wednesday morning.

A disabled Springfield woman was also invited to help open the newly upgraded entrance-way.

A proud moment for Goldie Clark, who loves coming to the Springfield Central library branch several times a week from her home on nearby Chestnut Street.

Read more – click here.

Springfield Central Library unveils new ramp and plaza